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Next [00:04:15] best worldviews [00:02:05] Robert Wiblin: Yeah, that's interesting. Are there any worldviews that are kind of on the borderline, like you're not sure whether to invite them to Thanksgiving or not, whether they are part of the family? What would maybe be the next best worldview that's currently not in the family? Ajeya Cotra: Yeah. So, I think it'll be very different for different people. My personal one that I struggle with... I mean, there are two. So the thing I mentioned about improving economic growth as a worldview, I have a lot of sympathy for. And I could pretty seriously imagine, at least for myself, wanting to let it sit at the table. The other one that I think is more [00:04:15] borderline and probably no, is something about improving civic institutions. There's something that attracts a part of me to trying to clean up your own house and be like 'the city upon the hill', like some dude said about America back in the day. It's just kind of like... A part of me feels pulled to improving democracy, and sort of shoring up our self governance, and all this stuff that I could maybe like pencil out through to either the near-termist human-centric worldview, or maybe the longtermist worldview, but the pull I feel isn't really coming from expecting those to pencil excellently or something.

Next [00:01:25] best worldviews [00:02:05] Robert Wiblin: Yeah, that's interesting. Are there any worldviews that are kind of on the borderline, like you're not sure whether to invite them to Thanksgiving or not, whether they are part of the family? What would maybe be the next best worldview that's currently not in the family? Ajeya Cotra: Yeah. So, I think it'll be very different for different people. My personal one that I struggle with... I mean, there are two. So the thing I mentioned about improving economic growth as a worldview, I have a lot of sympathy for. And I could pretty seriously imagine, at least for myself, wanting to let it sit at the table. The other one that I think is more [00:00:15] borderline and probably no, is something about improving civic institutions. There's something that attracts a part of me to trying to clean up your own house and be like 'the city upon the hill', like some dude said about America back in the day. It's just kind of like... A part of me feels pulled to improving democracy, and sort of shoring up our self governance, and all this stuff that I could maybe like pencil out through to either the near-termist human-centric worldview, or maybe the longtermist worldview, but the pull I feel isn't really coming from expecting those to pencil excellently or something.

Next [00:04:15] best worldviews [00:02:05] Robert Wiblin: Yeah, that's interesting. Are there any worldviews that are kind of on the borderline, like you're not sure whether to invite them to Thanksgiving or not, whether they are part of the family? What would maybe be the next best worldview that's currently not in the family? Ajeya Cotra: Yeah. So, I think it'll be very different for different people. My personal one that I struggle with... I mean, there are two. So the thing I mentioned about improving economic growth as a worldview, I have a lot of sympathy for. And I could pretty seriously imagine, at least for myself, wanting to let it sit at the table. The other one that I think is more [00:01:55] borderline and probably no, is something about improving civic institutions. There's something that attracts a part of me to trying to clean up your own house and be like 'the city upon the hill', like some dude said about America back in the day. It's just kind of like... A part of me feels pulled to improving democracy, and sort of shoring up our self governance, and all this stuff that I could maybe like pencil out through to either the near-termist human-centric worldview, or maybe the longtermist worldview, but the pull I feel isn't really coming from expecting those to pencil excellently or something.

Next [00:04:15] best worldviews [00:02:05] Robert Wiblin: Yeah, that's interesting. Are there any worldviews that are kind of on the borderline, like you're not sure whether to invite them to Thanksgiving or not, whether they are part of the family? What would maybe be the next best worldview that's currently not in the family? Ajeya Cotra: Yeah. So, I think it'll be very different for different people. My personal one that I struggle with... I mean, there are two. So the thing I mentioned about improving economic growth as a worldview, I have a lot of sympathy for. And I could pretty seriously imagine, at least for myself, wanting to let it sit at the table. The other one that I think is more [00:04:15] borderline and probably no, is something about improving civic institutions. There's something that attracts a part of me to trying to clean up your own house and be like 'the city upon the hill', like some dude said about America back in the day. It's just kind of like... A part of me feels pulled to improving democracy, and sort of shoring up our self governance, and all this stuff that I could maybe like pencil out through to either the near-termist human-centric worldview, or maybe the longtermist worldview, but the pull I feel isn't really coming from expecting those to pencil excellently or something